About a month ago, I resigned from NS8 Corp and joined Atimi Software. Atimi is a services based company (we do not maintain our own IP, unlike NS8), where we do custom programming for a lot of major companies out there that need our expertise. This means lots of varied and exciting projects on any platform you can imagine. Most of Atimi is involved in Macintosh development, however I was hired to boost their Windows/Java development staff as we are anticipating more Windows contracts down the line. Macintosh programmers are a hard find, and apparently we are always hiring more of them, as fast as we can find them.

I love working at Atimi - the work environment here is very developer-oriented, they really do take care of their developers here. All the equipment and software that we need to do our jobs are provided promptly, the pantry is well-stocked with munchies, pop and juice (even cereal), and everyone gets to sit on these comfy Aeron chairs. Sitting on those chairs really do make a difference!

But what I love about working at Atimi is their software development process. Speaking as an experienced software developer - trust me, Atimi has got this process down pat. They guarantee software projects are done on time, quite unheard of in software development circles.

I have always had an affinity for the Macintosh, and I am going to dive into some OS X programming soon, which is exciting - learning something new is always exciting for me (Ruby on Rails is next!). This week, about half the company is away at WWDC 2005 in San Francisco, where at the keynote Steve Jobs just announced that the Macintosh is moving to the Intel platform. That puts quite a few people in a pickle, like me, as I am considering buying some Macintosh hardware - namely a Powerbook, and perhaps a Mac mini desktop machine. Will my purchase be obsolete? Of course it will be - but not for a couple of years at least. By then, I probably want to move on to a faster Intel based Powerbook anyway - right on schedule with Apple’s roadmap for migrating to the Intel platform.

I’ll put off that purchase for now - besides I’m smack dab into doing some Windows GUI programming for a client. But of course, there is always an Apple connection - the software that I’m constructing connects to an iPod!